Miss Farah

Archive for the ‘Parents and education’ Category

This is the teachers’ favvvvorite topic! Parents this is becoming a big issue nowadays and it’s like the new trend!

Everyday during dismissal half of the parents don’t show up, but who does instead? Either the nanny or the driver…If i were a parent I would do anything just to see my child‘s face at the end of the day and hug him and get into the car together and get ready to go home. Believe me it would mean the world to them!

This is one issue,,,however another issue is the homework. I had a few kids whose homework wasn’t done by them and when I asked them they would tell me my nanny did it or she is helping me with my school work. Say what????

Please note that the nannies or helpers in our community are not very well educated and their English isn’t that good. Many of my kids used to speak incorrect grammar because they used to copy their nanny.

Now that is shocking, first teachers are not sending homework for your nanny to complete it and second parents or siblings are the ones who are supposed to support.

Where is the family bonding? Where is the parent’s involvement? This just saddens me and please note that this will affect the child mentally.

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I was walking around the playground today and noticed alot of girls eating healthy food and that’s because of the encouragement of teachers and the parents. I hope it will even get better.A healthy balance of foods provides the energy and nourishment everyone needs to survive and to enjoy life.I was happy to see that although there were still a few who were having chips and junk food. uh oh…took some photos check them out:

Kids need a lot of sleep to be happy. Unfortunately, studies show that kids are getting significantly less sleep per night than they did in previous generations. This is of no small consequence.

Not getting enough sleep can make kids:

  1. Less smart. In one study, researchers restricted the sleep of some students and extended the sleep of others for about 40 minutes over just three days. Kids who got less sleep showed worse performance in areas like learning, memory, and reaction times. How much worse? The difference between the two groups was “larger than or similar to the highly significant age differences between the fourth- and sixth-grade students” in the study. Losing two hours of sleep over three days set kids back two years.
  2. Inattentive. Sleepiness makes it hard for kids to pay attention, whether to their school work or to their parents. The effects of not getting enough sleep is much more evident in younger children, who tend to be quite distractible when tired.
  3. Fat. Sleep affects dozens of physiological and hormonal processes throughout our bodies, like how we store fat and burn calories. Kids who are “short sleepers” are more likely not just to be fat, but to actually be obese.
  4. Less creative. Sleep helps kids with verbal flexibility so that their speech is more articulate and creative. Decreased sleep can make them less fluent, and it can impair their thinking in ways that make them less imaginative and less able to problem solve.
  5. Moody and ill-behaved. I think this is obvious to every parent of every child who has ever missed a nap, but loads of good research backs this up: not getting enough sleep can make five year olds act like three year olds—miserable three year olds, to boot. Substance use, including using caffeine, alcohol, and tobacco, is greater in teens who sleep less, indicating that they are trying to cope with how they feel when tired.

Ensuring that your kids get enough sleep is your responsibility as a parent.

 

What book(s) did you you read to your kids last night? What book did your kids read to themselves? What book did you read?

Wouldn’t it be amazing if you could look back at a list of books your child (or you) read? Not just over the summer, but for the whole year?

How about if you could see the titles of all (or most) the books they read while they were growing up?

Can you imagine what a priceless gift that would be to both you and your child?

It doesn’t matter if you include just the title, date and author in your entry. Or if you write down your kid’s reactions to the book such as “Emily loved putting her fingers through the holes of everything the hungry caterpillar ate.” Or “John just wanted to find Goldbug on each page.” Or “Jennifer didn’t like the part with the Wicked Witch of the West.”

The only thing that matters is having one. How do you make that happen?

CLick here to print this reading log: http://www.countryclipart.com/ReadingLogs/myreadinglog5.gif

 

Step 1: Answer the question that was at the top of this post: What book(s) did you you read to your kids last night? What book did your kids read to themselves? What book did you read?

Step 2: Write it down.

Step 3: Repeat daily.

 

(I’d love to see what you and your kids read last night. Please comment! )

PBS Parents by Suzan    

 

What book(s) did you you read to your kids last night? What book did your kids read to themselves? What book did you read?

Wouldn’t it be amazing if you could look back at a list of books your child (or you) read? Not just over the summer, but for the whole year?

How about if you could see the titles of all (or most) the books they read while they were growing up?

Can you imagine what a priceless gift that would be to both you and your child?

It doesn’t matter if you include just the title, date and author in your entry. Or if you write down your kid’s reactions to the book such as “Emily loved putting her fingers through the holes of everything the hungry caterpillar ate.” Or “John just wanted to find Goldbug on each page.” Or “Jennifer didn’t like the part with the Wicked Witch of the West.”

The only thing that matters is having one. How do you make that happen?

CLick here to print this reading log: http://www.countryclipart.com/ReadingLogs/myreadinglog5.gif

 

Step 1: Answer the question that was at the top of this post: What book(s) did you you read to your kids last night? What book did your kids read to themselves? What book did you read?

Step 2: Write it down.

Step 3: Repeat daily.

 

(I’d love to see what you and your kids read last night. Please comment! )

PBS Parents by Suzan    

The Chinese have always emphasized on education. To them, education is crucial as it represents an opportunity of escape. The bedroom or study area is an important aspect of their development as well as the surroundings you give them.

Feng Shui has been used for thousands of years for a child’s education, and if you follow the tips below you will notice an improvement in study and concentration.

Position of desk

Make sure your child is not sitting with their back against the door, if this is the only way of arranging their room place a mirror so they can see the door behind them.

Position of study chair

Make sure that nothing sharp or piercing is directed towards the chair, as this will create more bad energy. Even a poster with arrows or airplanes with weapons pointing towards room causes bad energy.

Study table surroundings

Have your child sit with his or her head facing the best study direction and with solid support behind or a painting of a mountain scene to give support. Place a Crystal sphere in the main window to slow down or activate chi.

Try not to have your child sit straight in front of a window. Your child will lack in concentration.

Observe your child’s study area and desk. Are there any, exposed overhead beams or edges, or sharp edges of furniture, pillar or protruding corner nearby? Be observant of these factors as it brings bad energy. Keep the desk area clear of clutter and place a Buddha on the desk or a crystal ball.

Child’s Bedroom

This is a hard one, try and keep rooms tidy and clutter free (stop laughing)  you will be amazed how they help you once you get them into a routine. Again this is where Feng Shui works when you get a balance in your life’s, it also affects the people around you. You will find your family relationships will become stronger.

Feng Shui items you can use for children:

Read the rest of this entry »

The Chinese have always emphasized on education. To them, education is crucial as it represents an opportunity of escape. The bedroom or study area is an important aspect of their development as well as the surroundings you give them.

Feng Shui has been used for thousands of years for a child’s education, and if you follow the tips below you will notice an improvement in study and concentration.

Position of desk

Make sure your child is not sitting with their back against the door, if this is the only way of arranging their room place a mirror so they can see the door behind them.

Position of study chair

Make sure that nothing sharp or piercing is directed towards the chair, as this will create more bad energy. Even a poster with arrows or airplanes with weapons pointing towards room causes bad energy.

Study table surroundings

Have your child sit with his or her head facing the best study direction and with solid support behind or a painting of a mountain scene to give support. Place a Crystal sphere in the main window to slow down or activate chi.

Try not to have your child sit straight in front of a window. Your child will lack in concentration.

Observe your child’s study area and desk. Are there any, exposed overhead beams or edges, or sharp edges of furniture, pillar or protruding corner nearby? Be observant of these factors as it brings bad energy. Keep the desk area clear of clutter and place a Buddha on the desk or a crystal ball.

Child’s Bedroom

This is a hard one, try and keep rooms tidy and clutter free (stop laughing)  you will be amazed how they help you once you get them into a routine. Again this is where Feng Shui works when you get a balance in your life’s, it also affects the people around you. You will find your family relationships will become stronger.

Feng Shui items you can use for children:

Read the rest of this entry »